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A Free Reading Passage on the Boston Revolt of 1689 for AP U.S. History

Cate O'Donnell

3 min read

May 28

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The Boston Revolt of 1689 is a referenced topic in the Transatlantic Trade topic in Period 2 of AP U.S. History. You could reference this example on your AP U.S. History test.


Andros a Prisoner in Boston illustrated by F.O.C. Darley, William L. Shepard or Granville Perkins

Andros a Prisoner in Boston illustrated by F.O.C. Darley, William L. Shepard or Granville Perkins / public domain

The Boston Revolt of 1689 was an uprising in colonial America that reflected frustration with British rule and set the stage for future revolutionary movements. This revolt was part of a broader series of colonial reactions to the Glorious Revolution in England, which saw the overthrow of King James II and the ascension of William III and Mary II to the English throne.


In the late 17th century, King James II sought to strengthen royal control over the American colonies. In 1686, he consolidated several New England colonies into a single administrative entity known as the Dominion of New England. This dominion included Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Sir Edmund Andros was appointed as the governor of the Dominion.


Governor Andros’s administration was marked by unpopular policies, including the enforcement of the Navigation Acts, which restricted colonial trade, and the imposition of new taxes without the consent of colonial assemblies. Additionally, Andros limited town meetings and revoked land titles, causing widespread resentment among the colonists.


News of the Glorious Revolution and the overthrow of King James II reached Boston in April 1689. Encouraged by the change in leadership in England and motivated by their grievances against Andros’s administration, the colonists in Boston decided to take action. On April 18, 1689, a group of militia and citizens, led by prominent colonial figures such as Increase Mather and Cotton Mather, gathered in the streets of Boston to demand the removal of the governor. The revolt quickly gained momentum as more colonists joined the cause. The rebels seized control of key locations in Boston, including the fort and the governor’s residence. Governor Andros and his officials were arrested and imprisoned, ending the Dominion of New England.


The Boston Revolt of 1689 had several significant impacts. Firstly, it led to the restoration of local governance, with local assemblies regaining their authority to make decisions and pass laws. This restoration of local control was a crucial step toward the development of representative government in the colonies.


Secondly, the revolt increased colonial unity by demonstrating the potential for collective action among the colonies. The cooperation and coordination among various colonial leaders during the uprising laid the groundwork for future efforts at resistance against British policies.


Thirdly, the success of the revolt set a precedent for resistance, showing the colonists’ ability to overthrow unpopular authorities. This example of successful resistance would resonate in the colonies, influencing future revolutionary activities, including the American Revolution.


Lastly, the revolt had an impact on British colonial policy. Along with other colonial uprisings of the period, it made clear to the British crown that heavy-handed and centralized control would be met with resistance. This realization led to a more cautious approach in dealing with the American colonies in the subsequent years.




PRINTABLE READING PASSAGE ON the Boston Revolt of 1689

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The Boston Revolt of 1689 FREE Reading Passage


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Transatlantic Trade


Period 2


AP US HISTORY




Boston Revolt of 1689



#BostonRevoltof1689 #DominionofNewEngland #GloriousRevolution #GovernorAndros

Cate O'Donnell

3 min read

May 28

24

0

0

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